Current Exhibitions

Dylan Gebbia-Richards: Echo

August 24 - December 11, 2017
Mariani Gallery, Guggenheim Hall 

Opening Reception: Thursday, Aug 24: 4-9pm | Artist Talk: Wednesday, Oct 12: 5pm (Gugg Hall, Room 001)

 

Dylan Gebbia-Richards creates an explosive symphony of vivid colors by layering melted wax onto the surface of his work. While each mark begins as a tiny speck, the gradual buildup of these small gestures culminates in a sensory experience of unparalleled proportion. The artist’s innovative process awakens an alternate state of consciousness that stimulates hearing colors and seeing sounds, also known as chromesthesia. American Neurologist and author, Richard E. Cytowic described this perceptual phenomenon as, “something like fireworks” to the senses. 

The title of the exhibition, Echo references the acoustic effect that occurs when sound reflects off of bare, close fitting walls and distantly repeats. Gebbia-Richards explores the possibility of inverting this principal into a ‘visual echo’ by encompassing the viewer in a 30' x 20.5' life-size, textured painting. The 30’ x 20.5’ room was intentionally designed in the shape of a double ellipse to metaphorically reference the feedback loop of an echo’s repeat. For three weeks, the artist constructed what he calls “the chamber,” often noting distinct echoes reflecting off of various sloped, wave-like sections of the room. During the next seven weeks Gebbia-Richards covered the walls with a 4,128 pound storm of wax dense enough to absorb sound and echoes. The artist intentionally negated ambient noise within the enclosure to reduce auditory stimuli, allowing for a viewer’s visual sense to become more dominant, creating an "echo," of a visual nature. 

At any point within Echo the exhibition, the viewer stands at the threshold of an immersive color field. The topographical landscape reveals layers upon layers of an underlying color spectrum so luminous, they seem to vibrate from beneath. Each color is activated or triggered by the one laid before it to amass a momentous impact overall. Gebbia-Richards intentionally works with vivid pigments* to further explore these color frequencies and unearth a sensory assemblage of sight and sound.

- Pam Campanaro, Gallery Director + Curator

Dylan Gebbia-Richards, "Echo" (installation view)

Dylan Gebbia-Richards, "Echo" (installation view)

Dylan Gebbia-Richards, "Echo" (detail)

Beginning phases of planning the interior and exterior ellipse room.

Raising the first few walls for "Echo".

Raising the walls for "Echo".

Hand drawn and cut "fins", attached to the studs beams, create the sloped walls for "Echo".

"Echo" begins to take shape as the interior begins to get coated and resurfaced.

"Echo" begins to take shape as the interior begins to get coated and resurfaced.

Continued process creating the surface layer of "Echo".

Continued process creating the surface layer of "Echo".

*This exhibition was made possible through the generous support of KAMA Pigments and Lowes of Greeley.


 

Andrew Bablo & Pat Milbery: A New Light

Mural Permanently On View In Crabbe Hall Lobby

The lobby of Crabbe Hall, which houses our Oak Room Gallery and studios, served as a blank slate for duo Andrew Bablo and Pat Milbery to tackle this August. The east coast/west coast collaboration between Andrew Bablo and Pat Milbery results in an unprecedented revitalization of Crabbe Hall lobby. Built in 1919, the building houses UNC’s Oak Room Gallery and Visual and Performing Arts studios. Bablo and Milbery were inspired by the architecture and characteristics of the building such as its original oak doors, green marbled baseboards, and sky high arches and wanted their footprint within the space to compliment, not detract, from the classic beauty of the building’s interior. The result is a magical, sun drenched interior (in perfect time for the eclipse no less!) of aerosol paint.

Pat Milbery is, above all, a creative collaborator, as well known for the large-scale murals he's created alongside some of the most prominent street and graffiti artists in the world as he is for the playful photo shoots and video parts he's participated in as a pro snowboarder. His vivid street art collaborations adorn the walls of dozens of boutiques, breweries, residences, bars, and other businesses in Denver, around the Rocky Mountains, across the country and around the globe, and he's helped curate and create major art installation projects for brands including the Ford Motor Company, X Games, Budweiser, Zumiez, Loveland Ski Area, Wahoo Fish Tacos, and Pabst Blue Ribbon. He has shared snowboard contest podiums with the likes of Shaun White and Travis Rice, and the Snowboard Camp Tour he founded to make freestyle riding more accessible to kids is now entering its second decade. He's also the co-owner of So-Gnar, an umbrella collective responsible for the Snowboard Camp Tour, the So-Gnar streetwear and apparel line he helps design, and the Shredded Beats hip-hop concert series he promotes. He's equally proud of his Minnesota roots and his 17 years of Colorado transplant status, and splits his time between Denver and Golden and wherever his van full of snowboard gear and aerosol cans take him.  

From design to production, Andrew Bablo builds, crafts and experiments through the use of various media. Seeing no boundaries or limitations, he loves to work interactively, large-scale and in the eye of the public. Bablo started his career in branded and licensed apparel design, working with major league sports teams across the country. He spent years creating garments for several retail brands including Reebok and ’47. Later, Bablo collaborated with the industry’s top artists, athletes and brands as the former Editor-in-Chief of Steez Magazine. Over the course of nine years and 35 issues, Bablo grew the magazine from a black and white photocopier to a major publication, distributing throughout thousands of major newsstands such as Barnes & Noble in the U.S. and Canada. In 2015, Bablo founded Steez Design, bringing his artistic background to the commercial design world. Bablo graduated from Montserrat College of Art in 2007 with a Bachelors Degree in Graphic Design. Currently residing north of Boston, he works as an artist, designer and entrepreneur.

Andrew Bablo & Pat Milbery, Crabbe Hall lobby mural

Andrew Bablo & Pat Milbery, Crabbe Hall lobby mural

Andrew Bablo & Pat Milbery, Crabbe Hall lobby mural (in progress)

Andrew Bablo & Pat Milbery, Crabbe Hall lobby mural (in progress)

Andrew Bablo , Crabbe Hall lobby mural (in progress)

Andrew Bablo & Pat Milbery, Crabbe Hall lobby mural (in progress)

 


 

Researching Through the Lens of art

UNC Low Residence Art Education MA Program
September 7 - 21, 2017
Oak Room Gallery

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 7, 4-6p

 This exhibition is a culmination of the masters program in Art Education. These six artists each worked through an area of inquiry that had personal relevance as well as connections to their professional lives as artists and teachers. Their theses were varied from action research in the classroom seeking more about the creative process, researching strategies, student engagement, and incorporating maker spaces, to arts-based research grappling with issues of trauma, and survey results seeking to find who doodles and why. Some of the art you see here was a direct result of that arts-based research and some is art work that was created during studio classes without a direct link to research. Still, some of the work was created in a space between research and the studio aspect of this program.

Participating Artists: Matthew Crawford, Elizabeth Kaplan, David Rivers, Kathleen Robinson, Paula Vann, Jeremy Yocum

 

Jeremy Yocum Carl, 2017 Fibers, Plastic, and Wood

David Rivers Dream Figure, 2017 Wool, felted sweaters, cotton

Matthew Crawford Irritative Phenomena, 2017 Mixed media, Acrylic paint and copper wire

Elizabeth Kaplan Procrastination, 2016 Graphite, embroidery floss, alphabet beads

Paula Vann The Holy Trinity, 2017 Mixed media, Watercolor paint, Cotton, and Thread